Custom Commercial Work

We take our opportunities to work with architects and designers very seriously. We understand the time, effort, and dedication it takes to bring a design to fruition; to bring all the moving parts together for a vision to be realized. We are creative, have good ideas and are eager to work with other creatives. But we also know when to shut up and just meet spec. If you want our contribution we are happy to oblige, but if you don’t, know that your ideas and specifications will be respected and met on time. Rest assured that you are in capable hands. Dirty hands; but capable.

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This was a massive project for a local coffee shop. They were wanting something true to the material used. All the concrete was old school formed with rebar reinforcement and wet cast with industrial concrete. The counters were so heavy the floors had to be reinforced before casting. #commercial

This was a massive project for a local coffee shop. They were wanting something true to the material used. All the concrete was old school formed with rebar reinforcement and wet cast with industrial concrete. The counters were so heavy the floors had to be reinforced before casting. The counters were long and cantilevered. #commercial

There is so much texture and charm in the material of concrete. Much more than other man made materials and its much more versatile than any natural material. #commercial

This is a local Izakaya and Ramen House. This was a great project because we were able to utilize waxed steel and concrete in a variety of ways. This is a beautiful space that leverages the individual nature of the materials to great affect. Here the bar was centered between the old concrete supports and surrounded by the new concrete counters. Old meets new. #commercial

The raw edge of a sphere planter. The innate beauty of a material and the honesty of application is maybe what we love most about our work. #studio

The inner sanctum of the studio; though here it is looking more like a lair. #studio

This was a massive project for a local coffee shop. They were wanting something true to the material used. All the concrete was old school formed with rebar reinforcement and wet cast with industrial concrete. The counters were so heavy the floors had to be reinforced before casting. Here you can see that the concrete counter was cantilevered without support so shelving and appliances could easily slip under. #commercial

This is a local Izakaya and Ramen House. This was a great project because we were able to utilize waxed steel and concrete in a variety of ways. This is a beautiful space that leverages the individual nature of the materials to great affect. #commercial

This is a local Izakaya and Ramen House. This was a great project because we were able to utilize waxed steel and concrete in a variety of ways. This is a beautiful space that leverages the individual nature of the materials to great affect. The booths used concrete bases and welded steel seating with extended backs. #commercial

This is our standard sphere planter in the color “blackwater”. There are more finish options on our store.

This is a local Izakaya and Ramen House. This was a great project because we were able to utilize waxed steel and concrete in a variety of ways. This is a beautiful space that leverages the individual nature of the materials to great affect. Here the bar was centered between the old concrete supports and surrounded by the new concrete counters. Old meets new. #commercial

This is a local Izakaya and Ramen House. This was a great project because we were able to utilize waxed steel and concrete in a variety of ways. This is a beautiful space that leverages the individual nature of the materials to great affect. Here the counter has two tiers but are a single piece of concrete. #commercial

This was a massive project for a local coffee shop. They were wanting something true to the material used. All the concrete was old school formed with rebar reinforcement and wet cast with industrial concrete. The counters were so heavy the floors had to be reinforced before casting. Here you can see the indentations left by the form work. Maybe you could call this a working man’s palimpsest. #commercial

Architecture has its own realm. It has a special physical relationship with life. I do not think of it primarily as either a message or symbol, but as an envelope and background for life which goes on in and around it, a sensitive container for the rhythm of footsteps on the floor, for the concentration of work, for the silence of sleep.
— Peter Zumthor

This was a massive project for a local coffee shop. They were wanting something true to the material used. All the concrete was old school formed with rebar reinforcement and wet cast with industrial concrete. The counters were so heavy the floors had to be reinforced before casting. Concrete is generally thought to be visually heavy, but in this application it was light and helped keep the space bright. #commercial

This is a local Izakaya and Ramen House. This was a great project because we were able to utilize waxed steel and concrete in a variety of ways. This is a beautiful space that leverages the individual nature of the materials to great affect. Here the bar was centered between the old concrete supports and surrounded by the new concrete counters. Old meets new. #commercial

This is a local Izakaya and Ramen House. This was a great project because we were able to utilize waxed steel and concrete in a variety of ways. This is a beautiful space that leverages the individual nature of the materials to great affect. #commercial

“Today, when so much seems to conspire to reduce life and feeling to the most deprived and demeaning bottom line, it is more important than ever that we receive that extra dimension of dignity or delight and the elevated sense of self that the art of building can provide through the nature of the places where we live and work. What counts more than style is whether architecture improves our experience of the built world; whether it makes us wonder why we never noticed places in quite this way before.”
— Ada Louise Huxtable